Oak City Hustle
The Legendary Krispy Kreme Challenge

OakCity Hustle

Sean Kernick

The Legendary Krispy Kreme Challenge

Hailing from the north, I have learned in my year here that the south takes pride in its unique ventures. I try to explain to friends back home that a Waffle House isn’t a Belgian IHOP.  My family can’t imagine a magical place where you don’t have to bag your own groceries (Harris Teeter). When I first moved here, I was handed a box of Krispy Kremes and told, “Welcome to North Carolina.” “So this is my life now,” I thought.

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Turns out that in Raleigh, the doughnut company is creating more goodness than its sweet treats. The Krispy Kreme Challenge started out as a dare between NC State students and now has thousands of participants. Runners start out at the Memorial Bell Tower on the NSCU campus and race 2.5 miles to the Krispy Kreme on North Person Street. Once they get there, the task is to eat a dozen doughnuts before running back to the bell tower.

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Now I’m no runner, but one has to wonder what kind of preparation goes into completing this challenge. Do you practice with one or two doughnuts, maybe half a dozen? Are you bold enough to wait and see how your body handles the shock of the 2400 calories on that fateful day? I suppose that can’t be pretty.

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Regardless of a person’s gastrointestinal strength, participating in the run gives you an excuse to eat a ton of doughnuts for a great cause. All of the proceeds from the race go to the North Carolina Children’s Hospital, which has been ranked by U.S News & World Report as one of the nation’s best for pediatric care. This year, according to the Krispy Kreme Challenge Facebook page, the race donated $195,000. Since its inception, it has donated a total of $953,000 to the hospital. I may be extremely proud of my northern roots, but I don’t know of any other city that has this kind of claim to fame. 

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Sabrina Galli

Sabrina brings a versatility to the Oak City Hustle contributor squad that is tough to match. When she isn't working with Teach for America, reading or exploring North Carolina, Sabrina can be found wordsmithing the next feature article for Oak City Hustle.


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